ABC’s Of Dog Behavior: “A” Is For Aggression  


This article may be considered old news to many of you, but I believe it is an important to address training and behavior of dogs. When you first bring home a dog whether it’s your first or your tenth, you will need to train it. A puppy, adult/senior dog, shelter, rescue, or even from a breeder/pet store, you are going to have to train it. Even if a dog is listed as “trained”, you are going to have to train it!

I know all too well from working with shelters and rescues that sometimes people complain that they were mislead, being told a dog was supposed to be trained but then exhibited bad behavior. Sadly dogs are often returned for this reason, but it’s not the dogs fault, it’s not the shelters, rescues or even fosters fault–it’s the owners fault for not having patience! You must take the time to train whatever dog you bring into your home due to this being an entirely new environment with different rules than what they may have been used to. Lots of strange new things and people. As a dog owner, your dog’s behavior plays a key role in making a great family member.

Being that it is Pitbull Awareness Month, and there is a great deal of controversy about whether or not they are aggressive, the behavior topic I would like to discuss today is Aggression.

Let me begin by stating that understanding the cause of a dog’s aggression is essential to assessing and helping both the dog and yourself. The information I am sharing here today is NOT intended to replace the advice of your own Veterinarian. Professional help from a Veterinarian and a skilled behavior expert are key components for treating aggression in dogs. While this condition can be extremely frustrating for owners and for affected animals as well, there are steps that can be taken to address the situation. Euthanasia should never be an automatic “treatment” or “solution” for any behavioral disorders in our pets!!

Aggression is defined as an appropriate or inappropriate threat or challenge that is ultimately resolved by combat or submission. It is one of the most common behavioral problems in dogs. Aggression can occur in any breed, age or gender of dog and can be directed towards people or other animals. It is potentially very destructive, and very dangerous.

Aggression can take a number of forms and be caused by a number of things. Common signs of aggression can include biting, growling, snarling, curling lips, barking, snapping, head and tail up with direct stare, head and tail down with body withdrawn, frantic tail waving, posturing and lunging.

All breeds, ages and genders of dogs can become aggressive. However, very few dogs are born aggressive, and frequently aggressive behavior in dogs is normally a direct result of something else. It is possible for underlying medical conditions to cause or contribute to aggression, such as pain or neurological disorders which must be ruled out before an appropriate treatment protocol can begin.

No matter how gentle a puppy is, abuse, mistreatment, or neglect can cause any dog to suffer behavioral problems, including aggression. Dogs that are raised without proper socialization, nutrition and affection will not know how to act appropriately in social situations involving people and/or other dogs. It is extremely sad to see fear and other forms of aggression in a dog because of an abusive or neglectful background. I have seen this many times first hand and I can tell you it has literally brought me to tears.

Medical causes of canine aggression may include: pain, head trauma, swelling of the brain, rabies, distemper, epilepsy, arthritis and other neurological or painful disorders. Painful dogs may bite their owners without really knowing what they are doing (for example, after being hit by a car or attacked by another dog).

Aggressive behavioral problems are difficult to resolve without the assistance of a specialized trainer or Veterinary Behaviorist. The goals of treating canine aggression is to eliminate the aggressive behaviors and render the dog safer, to enhance human safety and the human-animal bond, to alleviate the anxiety causing the dog’s aggressive behavior and to make the dog and its people happier and calmer. Treatment for aggression involves desensitizing the dog to the stimulus which can be other dogs, threatening people, children approaching their food, etc. and counter-conditioning or rewarding the dog for calm or good behavior. Complete control over the dog, by either the owner or the trainer/behaviorist, is essential for this to work. No amount of advice can provide what your Veterinary Behavioral Specialist can provide to assess and address your dog’s particular situation. However, physical punishment and harsh restraint are strongly discouraged as they usually intensify aggression-based behaviors.

When it comes to puppies, proper socialization to people and to other dogs is critical. Puppies go through major developmental phases between 3 and 12 weeks of age where proper and positive interaction with other animals, people and environments are crucial to helping them develop appropriate solid social character traits. Puppy classes are an excellent way to achieve this socialization while establishing a solid training foundation. If you, the owner, fails during these critical developmental periods, your puppy may not develop the proper skills and behaviors to make it a good household member.

 

There are many different types of aggression, here are several that I believe are most common:

Fear Aggression

Fear aggression, or defensive aggression, happens when a dog perceives that it is in a threatening situation. The fearful reaction may be normal and appropriate under the circumstance, or it may be phobic. There is no age or gender predisposition for this form of aggression. Fear aggression can be extremely dangerous because it can lead to human harm. Signs of fear aggression include trembling, growling, barking, lip-lifting, snapping, cowering, crouching, backing up, lip-licking and tail tucking. Often, so-called “fear biters” have a history of abuse, and lash out when cornered. I deal with a dog that has these types of issues every day, if you missed my post about her and you want to read it, you can find her story here:

http:/www.pawsgivemepurpose.com/.blossoms-journey/

Impulse-Control Aggression also known as Dominance

Dominance aggression in dogs can occur in all breeds and either gender. The clinical signs involve growling, baring teeth, staring, a dominant and forward stance, and/or biting – particularly in response to people staring, reaching towards or over the dog or punishing it inappropriately. This type of aggression is often displayed toward human household members, when reaching for the pet, pushing it off furniture or approaching food or toys.

Interdog Aggression 

Interdog aggression is almost always exhibited between dogs of the same sex. The signs are intense staring, hair raising, growling and challenges, although frequently once a fight starts, the dogs are almost silent. I have seen this first hand, many times, it’s not pretty. Male dogs challenging one another with this type of aggression usually fight until one of them submits. Infights between females are worse, and this sadly is what I have had to deal with between Blossom and other female dogs in my household as well. It has lead to extremely severe injuries. Some cases of this type of aggression have even lead to death. (thankfully never in my home) Interdog aggression becomes dangerous to people only when they try to break up the fight, as the involved dogs are fighting irrespective of pain tolerance.

Territorial/Protection Aggression

This type of canine aggression is characterized by barking, growling, snarling, biting and other aggressive behaviors apparently designed to protect objects or people. It worsens when the dog is behind discrete boundaries, such as in a car or behind a fence. In most cases, these dogs are not aggressive away from their territory.

Food-Related Aggression

Food aggression is characterized by growling and lip-licking if approached, or sometimes even if only looked at, when eating. It often progresses to biting if removal of the food or treat is attempted. Obviously, this can be quite dangerous to people, especially children who may try to play with the dog and do not understand the dog’s verbal and postural warnings.

Dogs are NOT born aggressive!! While there are some breeds that are particularly trainable to a number of behaviors, including aggressive ones, (like our loving PitBulls who are used for fighting) they do not come by aggressiveness on their own. Aggressive dogs are those that have been mistreated, ignored, chained, unsocialized or improperly trained during critical periods of development. Humane training methods under the guidance of a skilled trainer can help nip aggressive behavior in the bud. Consistency, kindness and predictability in managing aggression is critical. Many talented, knowledgeable canine behavior experts are available to help you and your Veterinarian address aggression if you experience any issues with your dog!

It is my hope over time to create a series of articles about dog behaviors so I ask that you please leave me some comments about what you and your dog may need help dealing with and I can try to address those behavioral issues specifically.

Sources and further reading:

https://k9aggression.com/dog-aggression-overview/types-of-dog-aggression/?v=7516fd43adaa

https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/dog-care/common-dog-behavior-issues/aggression

http://www.canismajor.com/dog/aggres1.html

Shelter Spotlight: Cola, A Wonderful Best Friend

PLEASE SHARE TO HELP COLA ! 💜 HOMELESS FOR TWO YEARS 😩Cola’s friends would love you to share him with your friends and family He just marked his 2 year anniversary at the shelter. It’s really been too long for such a handsome fellow to be without his own family. You can also check out his FB page .Cola is Coming to Town✅Cola was born to be someone's true-blue best friend--might he be yours?✅Has the most heart-melting gaze✅ 3 year old 65 lb goofball ✅One gorgeous brindle boy who wants to be the apple of your eye so for now only pet ✅Low-maintenance kind of guy✅Just wants to be loved and treated kindly✅Affectionate and people loving✅Sweet, cuddly couch companion✅Would love to be your adventure partner, too, but he's happy to chill at home and be your be tv watching partner✅So easy to fall in love withWhen you meet him, you will see why he's such wonderful best-friend material.Cola is full of sweetness, and such a great companion. He cannot wait to meet his family and and start showing his love and affection for them! His ideal home would let him join in on any family adventures. He reveres his outside times during his tennis balls He would be thrilled if he joined a family that appreciated that. Mostly, Cola just wants a home that will love him forever! Come meet Him 💙 He promises to be the best friend he can be!Yonkers Animal Shelter 1000 Ridge Hill BlvdYonkers NYLesliem147@gmail.com 201 981 3215

Posted by Yonkers Animal Shelter on Wednesday, October 11, 2017
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Today I would like to introduce you all to a very handsome boy named Cola. Sadly, he just marked his 2 year anniversary at the Yonkers Shelter. It’s really too long for such a handsome fellow to be without his own family. Cola was born to be someone’s true-blue best friend, could it be you??

Here’s what makes this boy SO special:

Cola is a 3 year old 65 lb goofball and has the most heart-melting gaze. He’s one gorgeous brindle boy who wants to be the apple of your eye, so for now only pet is recommended.

He did seem ok around other dogs at first, but life in the shelter has changed him, so he may possibly be dog selective. A meet and greet is recommended to assess this situation. He is not fond of cats, and a home with children over 10 would be best.

He is a low-maintenance kind of guy that just wants to be loved and treated kindly. He’s a sweet, cuddly couch companion very affectionate and people loving!

Cola also has an adventurous side, he would love to be your adventure partner, but he’s also happy to chill at home and be your tv watching partner too.

Cola is just extremely sweet dog, and a great companion. He cannot wait to meet his forever family and and start showing his love and affection for them! His ideal home would let him join in on any family adventures. He loves outside time so a fenced in yard is a must, he loves tennis balls, and outdoor play so he would be thrilled to join a family that appreciated that too. Mostly, Cola just wants a home that will love him forever!

For more information on Cola you can visit his petfinder page:

https://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/34012425?utm_campaign=social+share+button&utm_medium=social+media&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=found

PLEASE SHARE TO HELP COLA!! Stop by and visit his Facebook page like and share that too!

https://www.facebook.com/Cola-is-Coming-to-Town-394921670853460/

Growing up behind bars is not where he should be! Please help me help Cola find his forever family so he can live the life he truly deserves! Cola is very easy to fall in love with, head to the shelter for a visit, when you meet him, you will see why he would make a wonderful best-friend!

If you or anyone you know is interested in his handsome boy please use any of the above links or contact information below to inquire about him.

Yonkers Animal Shelter

1000 Ridge Hill Blvd

Yonkers NY

Lesliem147@gmail.com

(201) 981- 3215

K9 Meatballs


You can’t go wrong with this K9 Meatball recipe! Easy for you to make and bake, delicious and nutritious for your pup to enjoy. 

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 pound extra lean ground beef or ground chicken (or mix them if you like)
  • 1/2 cup cooked whole grain brown rice
  • 1 shredded carrot
  • 1 stalk chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained
  • 2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 tablespoons shredded cheese
  • 1 egg
  • 2 teaspoons ground turmeric
  • unrefined extra virgin coconut oil or extra virgin olive oil to coat pan

Instructions:

  • preheat oven to 400 degrees 
  • grease muffin pan or baking sheet 
  • combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix well
  • fill each muffin tin with about 1/4 cup of the mixture, or form mixture into balls and place on baking sheet
  • bake about 15 minutes or until cooked through (oven times may vary)
  • let cool completely before serving 

Note: If your pup is on a grain free diet, just leave out the rice. 

As always, I ask that you please check with your own Veterinarian about which foods are appropriate for your pup. 

Recipe adapted from:

https://www-rachaelraymag-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.rachaelraymag.com/.amp/recipe/k-9-ingredient-meatballs

Heartworm Prevention

While preparing this post about heartworm prevention for dogs, I came across many controversial issues during my research. While I myself do give my pups Heartgard monthly, I am now beginning to get a little concerned. Of all the supplements, vitamins and preventatives I use, Heartgard is the only Vet prescribed preventative used; everything else I use is all natural and non-chemical. (essential oils, vitamins, herbs)

We all know that our Veterinarians prescribe heartworm preventative for a reason. Heartworm is a serious and potentially fatal disease caused by foot-long worms that live in the heart, lungs and associated blood vessels of affected dogs.

Dogs are considered a natural host for heartworms, meaning that heartworms living inside dogs mature into adults, mate and produce offspring. If untreated, numbers can increase and dogs have been known to harbor several hundred worms in their bodies. Heartworm disease causes lasting damage to the heart, lungs and arteries, and can affect the dog’s health and quality of life long after the parasites are gone. For this reason, Veterinarians believe prevention is by far the best option, and treatment, when needed, should be administered as early in the course of the disease as possible.

While heartworm preventives are highly effective, they do have risks; no drug is entirely harmless. Heartworm preventives are chemical insecticides with the potential for short- and long-term side effects that can damage your pet’s health. Adverse effects of heartworm preventions include reactions such as vomiting, loss of appetite, shock, tremors, coma, seizures, and respiratory failure.While drug reactions can happen in any pet, some breeds are particularly sensitive to certain drugs. If you are concerned, your Veterinarian can actually run a test and find out. A quick blood sample or cheek swab can be taken to test for the presence of the MDR1 mutation which determines whether your dog may have increased sensitivity to these drugs. That said, it’s important to keep in mind that any pet can have a reaction to any medication at any time. 

In addition to concerns about the toxicity of these insecticides, there is also evidence growing of heartworm resistance to preventives. A “Superbug” resistance is typically the result of overuse of certain drugs, like antibiotics.

There are a number of heartworm preventatives advertised as being natural alternatives available on the market. Most of them are basically combination of liquid extracts, herbs, and, essential oils, with some diatomaceous earth and black walnut. While some of these ingredients can help to “repel” pests their effectiveness to actually prevent infection is, doubtful.

The latest rationale for recommending year-round heartworm preventives to all pets everywhere is that “… heartworm disease has been diagnosed in all 50 states, and risk factors are impossible to predict.” While it may be true that at least 1 dog in all 50 states has been affected, it does not mean heartworm disease is a significant threat in every state, or even in most states.

If you live in an area of the U.S. where mosquitoes are common and you know your dog’s risk of exposure is significant, here are some recommendations for protecting your furry family member:

With guidance from your Veterinarian try using natural preventives like heartworm nosodes rather than chemicals.

Since heartworms live in your pet’s bloodstream, natural GI (gastrointestinal) dewormers, such as diatomaceous earth, and anti-parasitic herbs (e.g., wormwood, pumpkin seed, black walnut tinctures) are NOT effective at killing larvae in the bloodstream.

Focus on keeping your dog’s immune system in tip-top shape by feeding an appropriate diet that helps bolster natural defenses.

If your dog’s kidneys and liver are healthy, try using a chemical preventive at the lowest effective dosage. Give the treatment at six-week intervals rather than every four weeks, for the minimum number of months required during mosquito season.

Avoid all-in-one chemical products that claim to get rid of multiple types of worms and external parasites as well. The goal is to use the least amount of chemical necessary that successfully treats heartworm. Adding other chemicals just increases the toxic load your dog’s body must contend with. Also it is recommended to avoid giving your pet a chemical flea/tick preventive during the same week.

Always insist on a heartworm test before beginning any preventive treatment. If your pup spends a lot of time outdoors it is recommended to test for heartworm every six months. The reason is because parasites are becoming resistant to heartworm, flea and tick chemicals. The sooner an infection is identified in your pup the sooner treatment can begin with fewer long-term side effects. 

Obviously, there’s tons of information out there on both sides of the heartworm prevention issue. I have shared what I think is important for all of us to know. I also recommend you do your own research, and if you have concerns or your pet has had any kind of reaction to the preventative you are giving, sit down and talk to your Veterinarian. Don’t be afraid to voice your concerns!

So you may be asking what does this author think now? If I had a dog that had a specific issue or reaction I may try other holistic methods, but based on my research and weighing the pros and cons, I honestly believe your dog is more likely to contract and even die from heartworms than to have a reaction to the prevention. 

Sources and further reading: 

http://m.petmd.com/dog/conditions/infectious-parasitic/natural-heartworm-prevention-dogs-does-it-exist

https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/guide/heartworms-in-dogs-facts-and-myths

https://m.onlynaturalpet.com/holistic-healthcare-library/heartworms/154/the-truth-about-heartworms.aspx

https://www.heartwormsociety.org

Shelter Spotlight: Barley Needs A Hero

WILL YOU HELP?BARLEY'S PAGE...PLEASE LIKE...PLEASE SHAREhttps://www.facebook.com/adoptBarley/Barley is a gorgeous boy who is looking for love, he has found himself homeless at the animal shelter. He was picked up stray by a Good Samaritan and no one has come in to take him home.Barley is has been in the shelter for over 2 years. Which we have no idea why. He is a favorite with the volunteers, but sadly no one ever asks about him.All he wants is to be loved❤... will you be his heroBarley is being treated for Anaplasmosis, he is well on his way to recovery and will be better in no time. He is 60 pounds, 5-7years young, up to date on vaccinations and heartworm negative.Intake date February 10, 2015Brookhaven Animal Shelter300 Horseblock RoadBrookhaven, NY 11719(631) 451-6950

Posted by The Forgotten Ones - The Longest Residents In Long Island Shelters on Thursday, October 12, 2017
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Barley is a gorgeous boy who is looking for love. He was picked up as a stray by a Good Samaritan in February of 2015 and no one has come to take him home.

Barley has been in the shelter for over 2 years. Sadly he is known as the “invisible boy in the shelter”. He is another of the forgotten dogs that I mentioned in my September 20th post:

http://www.pawsgivemepurpose.com/shelter-spotlight-the-forgotten-ones/

Barley is a favorite with the volunteers, but sadly no one that comes to the shelter ever asks about him. He has no interest 😓 He cries himself to sleep every night in his kennel. Just hearing about this breaks my heart into a million pieces. ALL HE WANTS IS TO BE LOVED! Will you be his hero??

Barley is the complete package! He loves attention, playing with toys, spending time outside with people running, playing, hiking. He also makes a great cuddle buddy and can sit on the couch snuggled up to you while you watch a movie or read a book. Barley does however need to be your one and only, in an adult home with no children and no other pets.

Barley is being treated for Anaplasmosis, a tick-born disease, he is well on his way to recovery and will be better in no time. He is 60 pounds, 5-7 years young, up to date on vaccinations and is heartworm negative.

I ask that you please share this post, and head over to Barleys Facebook page and like and share it too! We need to help him get noticed!

https://www.facebook.com/adoptBarley/

Let’s show him that his life matters, that he’s not invisible!! Help me help Barley get out of the shelter so he can really begin to live the life he deserves.

Brookhaven Animal Shelter

300 Horseblock Road

Brookhaven, NY 11719

(631) 451-6950

 

Shelter Spotlight: Jalapeño, Nothing But Love To Give

NO ONE WANTS ME.💔...Jalapeño....The Longest resident in the shelterHer page...please like ...please sharehttps://www.facebook.com/NeedsAForeverHome/Jalapeño Needs A Forever HomeJalapeño is a sweet and lovable girl who will steal your heart.She was picked up stray by an Animal Control Officer and waited everyday but sadly her family was no where to be found. She arrived so scared and nervous but has come out of her shell. She still takes things slowly but have no doubt that she will be your loyal and best friend.Jalapeño loves tennis balls and treats. She also loves to dress up for holidays. One of her favorite things to do is to sit out front on a sunny day and give kisses to her volunteer friends.She would do best as the one and only furbaby in an adult home.Jalapeño is about 55 pounds, 4 years young, spayed, up to date on vaccinations, heartworm negative and microchipped.She is looking for true love and a second chance for a good life.Could you be the person to share her life?intake date 5/10/14Brookhaven Animal Shelter300 Horseblock RoadBrookhaven, NY 11719(631) 451-6950

Posted by Jalapeño Needs A Forever Home on Sunday, August 20, 2017
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Today I would like to introduce you to Jalapeño. Another heartbreaking story that will touch your heart. This sweet and lovable girl who will steal your heart is sadly the longest resident at the shelter, this is her 4th Fall behind bars 😓 Another one of the “Forgotten Ones” sitting in a shelter kennel for way too long.

http://www.pawsgivemepurpose.com/shelter-spotlight-the-forgotten-ones/

Jalapeño was picked up as a stray by Animal Control in May of 2014 and waited everyday but sadly her family was nowhere to be found. She arrived so scared and nervous, but has come out of her shell. She still takes things slowly but there’s no doubt that she will be a loyal and best friend.

Jalapeño loves tennis balls and treats; she also loves to dress up for holidays. One of her favorite things to do is to sit out front on a sunny day and give kisses to her volunteer friends. She would do best as a one and only furbaby in an adult home.

Jalapeño is about 55 pounds, 4 years old, spayed, up to date on vaccinations, heartworm negative and microchipped. She is looking for true love and a second chance for a good life. Could you be the one to share her life?

Please help me help Jalapeño find her forever family. Like, share network this page, and her Facebook page, together we can do this!

https://www.facebook.com/NeedsAForeverHome/

Brookhaven Animal Shelter

300 Horseblock Road

Brookhaven, NY 11719

(631) 451-6950

 

 

Crockpot Chicken 

Have you thought about making your own homemade dog food but feel like it can be an overwhelming thing to do? This easy crockpot chicken recipe is a great place to get started!

This recipe is delicious and full of nutritional value for your pet. Sweet potatoes and green beans are a great sources of beta-carotene, minerals, and fiber. This also happens to be a great recipe for managing your pet’s weight. The chicken provides the protein your pet needs to stay healthy, and the fiber helps your pup feel full with fewer calories!

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup whole grain brown rice 
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/2 pound green beans, broken into segments
  • 1 sweet potato, cut into chunks 
  • 3 carrots, sliced 
  • 2 boneless chicken breasts

Depending on the size of your crockpot, and your dogs food portion requirements, you can double or even triple the ingredients so you have enough food prepared for a few days.

Instructions:

  • place all ingredients into the crockpot in the order listed above (layer, do not mix)
  • cook on low for about 8 hours, on high for about 5 hours 
  • when cooking is complete, mix, breaking up the chicken into small pieces (everything will be soft)
  • allow to cool and serve

You can store any unused portion in your fridge for up to three 3 days. 

If your dog is on a grain free diet, leave out the rice and toss in some more veggies! Try adding some broccoli florets, zucchini, spinach or squash. If you want to change up the recipe so your pup can have variety, you can use other protein sources such as beef cubes, turkey or lamb.

Important note: Remember when making homemade dog food, it is vital that you speak with your own Veterinarian to come up with a plan that includes all the proper vitamins/supplements so you can be sure you’re providing your dog with all the nutrients they need. 

Shelter Spotlight: Dinah Is Heartbroken

You are the one

YOU ARE THE ONEDinah was found as stray and waiting for her family to come but unfortunately they never came.If you visit the shelter you may find Dinah sitting at the end of her kennel or leaning on the fence with such forlorn look in her eyes as she wonders why she has been in the shelter so long. But once she notices you it is quickly overcome with excitement in the hopes that soon she will have a home, a family, the love that she so deserves.Dinah is a sweet girl, loves toys, the snow and being with people.She absolutely lives for belly rubs.Dinah is very active and would do best with an active adult family, whether they are runners, hikers or choose to do agility or scent training with her. She is playful and smart..very easy to train.She is good with most male dogs as long as they are not as dominant as her and would be best in an adult only home with no kids, and no cats.Dinah is a 5 year old female, spayed.She weighs approximately 60 lbsIs a bull terrier /shep mixApprox. DOB June 2011Arrived to Shelter: February 10, 2014Smithtown Animal Shelter410 E Main StSmithtown, New York(631) 360-7575

Posted by Dinah Is Heartbroken At Smithtown Shelter on Saturday, March 18, 2017
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Beautiful Dinah is yet another forgotten soul sitting in a shelter kennel for much too long. I first introduced you to Dinah in my article entitled “Shelter Spotlight: The Forgotten Ones”. In case you might have missed that post you can find it here:

http://www.pawsgivemepurpose.com/shelter-spotlight-the-forgotten-ones/

I know that no 2 people are the same, but when it comes to dogs I really can’t wrap my head around the fact that they can just be let go, given up, tossed in a shelter, unwanted then euthanized for simply being. My pups are family members, I would NEVER do something like this! I have gone through difficult times, I have had dogs with difficult behaviors, those that have aged, etc; I never gave up on them. I did and will continue to do what is necessary to keep them here with their loving family!

I am pleading with you all to to please take a minute and think about what this is like. Dogs, like people, have feelings. When you grow older or maybe your child isn’t listening to you, would this be how you’d handle the situation? Would you let your parent, your child, your aging grandparent out into the street or tie them to a fence for someone to find them because you decided they were no longer of use to you?

Beautiful Dinah was evidently tossed out into the street in this manner, arriving at the shelter February 10, 2014. She was found as a stray and waited for her family to come, but unfortunately they never came.

If you visit the shelter you may find Dinah sitting at the end of her kennel or leaning on the fence with such a forlorn look in her eyes; she wonders why she has been in the shelter so long. But once she notices you she is quickly overcome with excitement in the hopes that soon she will have a home, a family, the love that she so deserves!

Dinah is a sweet girl who loves toys, playing in the snow and being with people. She absolutely lives for belly rubs and is very active so she would do best with an adult family. Whether they are runners, hikers or choose to do agility or scent training with her, she would greatly enjoy this.

Dinah is playful and smart; she is known to be very easy to train. She is good with most male dogs as long as they are not dominant, and would be best in a home with no cats. Dinah is a 5 year old female, spayed Bull Terrier/Shep mix weighing approximately 60 lbs.

I ask that you please help me help Dinah get out of the shelter and into a loving forever home, where she can begin to really live the life she deserves!

I ask that you please head over to her Facebook page, like, share, network this girl! Together we can find Dinah’s forever family, I know they are out there searching for her.

https://www.facebook.com/adoptDinah/

Smithtown Animal Shelter

410 E Main St

Smithtown, New York

(631) 360-7575

Watermelon Banana Pupsicles


Although the Calendar says it’s officially Fall, we are still experiencing temps in the high 80’s here in New Jersey. The pups need to be able to cool down when they come inside, and besides serving fresh cool water, and running my AC, another easy way to do this is to serve a refreshing frozen treat! 

Ingredients:

  • 15 pieces of watermelon cubed 
  • 1 banana 
  • 1 teaspoon natural honey 

Instructions: 

  • mix all ingredients in a blender
  • pour into an ice cube tray or any shape mold 
  • freeze for about 2 hours or until set 

Just pop out the treats from your mold and serve. Your pup will LOVE them, mine sure do!